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Tag Archives: Women

Women in the Airforce, 1940

I have been very busy with work recently, so forgive the lack of blogging. For the next while I will just post interesting articles I come across, like this one from 1940-

  

Churchill’s Girls – From Dashing to Tragic

Churchill’s Girls – From Dashing to Tragic

I am in between scanners at present, so here is one Post I prepared earlier…

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was the Prime Minister of the UK for most of WWII, from 1940 to 1945 (and again from 1951 to 1955). He is often stated as being one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century,  and his radio broadcasts help inspire the British people during the war.  His children also did their bit to help the war effort.

Churchill’s only son, Randolph, served with the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars and the SAS),  Eldest daughter Diana gained the rank of officer between 1939 and 1945 in the Women’s Royal Naval Service, middle daughter Sarah, between acting jobs, joined the WAAF and went on to interpret aerial photographs for British invasions.

Winston Churchill is accompanied by his daughter Sarah, Cairo, December 1943

 
Youngest daughter Mary worked for the Red Cross and the Women’s Voluntary Service from 1939 to 1941, and served with the Auxiliary Territorial Service in London, Belgium and Germany in mixed anti-aircraft batteries, rising to the rank of Junior Commander (equivalent to Captain). Mary also accompanied her father on several of his overseas journeys, including his post-VE trip to Potsdam, where he met with Harry S Truman and Joseph Stalin.

Churchill with daughter Mary at Potsdam Conference

This article from November 1940 shows how the girls captured the publics interest-

churchills dashing daughters

Unfortunately Diana suffered nervous disorders and in 1963, age 54, while working for a suicide prevention organisation, she committed suicide by taking an overdose of barbiturates.

Sarah is best known for her role in the film Royal Wedding (1951), with Fred Aistere, and she made about nine movies in total. Problems with alcohol led to her death in 1982 at the age of 67.

 

November 1950

 
Mary, on her marriage Lady Mary Soames, was the last surviving child of Sir Winston Churchill, and died in 2014 at the age of 91. She left a fortune of more than £22 million, in trust to her five children, and in December 2014, Sotheby’s London auctioned on behalf of her heirs, 255 items out of her collection, including paintings by and memorabilia attached to her father. Mary’s daughter, Emma Soames, has written a book about her mother, which you read about Here.

 

the tragic Churchills

November 1963

  
 

Finland’s Women Face War Horrors, December 1939

 Not a cheery Christmas tale, but interesting reading none the less. I never really think of Finland being involved in the war, but it really was a World War, wasn’t it?

finland during WWII  
finlands women face  war horrors 

Living on Wartime Rations – Day 1 & The National Loaf

    Yesterday was Saturday, the first day of our week of living on wartime rations. Given that the children are meant to be having around 7 slices of bread a day, we had toast for breakfast, from day old bread, with a little butter and plum jam that I made last Summer.  The children had one glass of milk each and hubby and I had a coffee with a spoon of cream.

    Day old national loaf, homemade plum jam and almost a weeks worth of butter for five

      

    Toasted national loaf, a smidge of butter and jam and coffee with 1 tbsn cream

     

    bean and grated carrot sandwiches – I love my ‘new’ vintage op shop cloth ($1)!

     
    We ate sandwiches
    with homemade bean paste and grated carrot for lunch with a glass or two of water each, followed by a small locally grown mango each.
    I usually bake a loaf of bread every second day – grain and wholemeal – so the kids are used to it for their school lunches. It won’t be a shock like it was to millions of white bread eating Britons when the mainly wholemeal National Loaf, was introduced. Bakers were banned from making any other type of bread except the national loaf, made with national flour, and many people hated it.  But being high in vitamin B, wholemeal flour was nessessary for people eating smaller amounts of meat and eggs.
     
    why eat wholemeal bread

    from The Australian Women’s Weely, November 1944

     
    Recipe: The National Loaf (makes 2 loaves)

    • 1 ½ lb national flour (wholemeal with 15% white or potato flour)
    • 1 ½ tbsp salt (this is a LOT but it helped to preserve it)
    • 1 ½ tbsp dried yeast
    • 1 dsp honey or treacle
    • 450 ml tepid water With 1/2 vitamin c tablet dissolved

    1) Mix together all the ingredients and knead for about 10 minutes until you have a soft dough. Place the dough in an oiled bowl, cover with a tea towel and leave until dough has doubled in size (around 2 hours).

    2) Knock back the dough, give a short knead then cut into two equal pieces. Place in 1.5 litre loaf tins, allow to rise for a further 2 hours.

    2) pre-heat oven to 200°c then bake loaves for 30 min. To test the loaves turn them out of their tins and give the base a tap. if it sounds hollow they are ready. Allow to cool on a wire rack.

    (I often use the juice of half an orange in my mix instead of the vitamin C tablet, it helps the bread to rise and means less kneading, and provides the sweetness for the yeast instead of the honey. My mix is usually two cups wholemeal, one cup grains, 1/2 cup rye and 1/2 cup white and just a pich of salt which makes 1 loaf. I find a tablespoon of oils helps the bread keep and makes it softer. Sometimes I leave out the grains and do a different shape, like ciabatta, or rolls, just to mix it up a bit!)

     

    the wholemeal grain loaf, this one didn’t rise very much!

     
    We had an exciting afternoon tea – left over bread with jam, no butter, for the kids, who also had milk in their tea, and just black tea for us grownups. I have just been rewatching the first episode of ‘the 1940s house’ and have been inspired watching the ladies go without so the kids can have more! I am pretty sure my son sneaked a mandarin as well.

     

    the world’s most exciting afternoon tea

     
    Dinner was a stew – kangaroo. We don’t have rabbits here in Queensland, but kangaroos are plentiful, and although it has only recently hit our supermarket shelves, country people have been eating ‘roo’ for decades. My stew recipie is based on the brown stew guidelines below, from my new goto book (which you can find as an ebook on Amazon).

     

    my new go to book, Eating for Victory

     
     

    tips for good wartime stews

     
     I used 500gm kangaroo for the meat and added one clove of garlic and some dried oregano for flavour. The tomatoes were a gift from a neighbour and the veggies were scrubbed instead of peeled for less waste and more vitamins.

     

    Kangaroo stew ingredients, including 1 clove of garlic. Note the flour, I had just kneaded the bread and didn’t want to waste it!

     
      
    Being Saturday I did have one cocktail, but the rest of the night was water. We had a square of dark chocolate each and an after dinner coffee for the grownups.

    Not a bad first day, and I also op shopped, gardened, put up a new fence for the ducks and did laundry. And finally found my elusive tape measure and measured vintage tablecloths for the Etsy store. Yeh me!

    Australian Army Medical Women’s Service, 1942

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    Working War Time Women and Rosie the Riveter

    Several American companies already had contracts with the government to produce war equipment for the Allies from 1939, and when the United States entered the war in 1942 war production had to increase even further in a short amount of time.  Auto-mobile factories were converted to build air-planes, shipyards were expanded, and new factories were built. These facilities needed workers, and as men were leaving for service, women were needed.

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    Now not only were minority and lower-class women working, as they had always done, but now white middle-class women were asked to step up. Only for the duration of the war of course.  During the Depression and before the war, most people were against women working because they saw it as women taking jobs from unemployed men. So now the government had to convince women that working outside the home was necessary – hence another  propaganda campaign – to sell the importance of the war effort and to lure women into working.

    These wonderful photos from the Library of Congress on Flickr were also part of that campaign.

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    “Mrs. Doris Duke, who is 26 and a mother of one child, Corpus Christi, Texas. Mrs. Duke is a civil service worker in the Assembly and Repair dept. at the Navy Air Base. he she is seem reconditioning spark plugs.”

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    “Answering the nation’s need for womanpower, Mrs. Virginia Davis made arrangement for the care of her two children during the day and joined her husband at work in the Naval Air Base, Corpus Christi, Texas. Both are employed under Civil Service in the Assembly and repair department. Mrs. Davis’ training will enable her to take the place of her husband should he be called by the armed service”

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    “Mrs. Virginia Davis, a riveter in the assembly and repair department of the Naval air base, supervises Chas. Potter, a NYA trainee from Michigan, Corpus Christi, Texas. After eight weeks of training he will go into civil service. Should he be inducted or enlist in the armed service, he will be valuable to mechanized units of the Army or Navy.”

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    “Oyida Peaks riveting as part of her NYA training to become a mechanic in the Assembly and Repair Department at the Naval Air Base, Corpus Christi, Texas.”

    The most popular and well know propaganda image for war time working women is probably ‘Rosie the Riveter’ –  first used in 1942 in a song of the same name written by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb, and a national hit. The song portrays “Rosie” as a tireless assembly line worker, who is doing her part to help the American war effort.

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    Here is a real-life “Rosie the Riveter” operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, Tennessee, working on an A-31 Vengeance dive bomber.

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    In 1942, Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller was hired by the Westinghouse Company’s War Production Coordinating Committee to create a series of posters for the war effort -one of these posters became the famous “We Can Do It!” image.

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    This poster was designed as a morale booster rather than a recruitment poster, and when it was rediscovered in the 1980’s it became associated with feminism, and often mistakenly called “Rosie The Riveter.”

    On Memorial Day, May 29, 1943 Norman Rockwell’s image of “Rosie the Riveter” featured on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post – a strong woman taking her lunch break with a rivet gun on her lap and beneath her Penny loafer a copy of Hitler’s manifesto, Mein Kampf.

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    If you look closely you an see that her lunch pail reads “Rosie”, and the public quickly recognized this to be “Rosie the Riveter” from the earlier song. Rockwell’s model was 19-year-old Mary Doyle, a telephone operator near where Rockwell lived in Vermont, not a riveter, but the image was so  popular that the magazine loaned it to the U.S. Treasury Department for the duration of the war, for use in war bond drives.

    If you can find a copy, the 1984 movie ‘Swing Shift‘ with Goldie Hawn gives a great insight into these working women.

    Women’s War Work and Corset Care, October 1941

    I just love this whole magazine page from October 1941 it shows some of the jobs women did during the war, and then has an ad for corsets and how to care for them. Can you imagine having to worry about your underwear while doing war work, caring for children and worrying about your partner faraway?

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    Australian Girls working for the US Army, 1942

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